Saturday, 20 February 2016

Education and Slow Food Norwich

One of the several projects that Slow Food Norwich is involved with this year is bringing the highly important topic of food education to schools, community groups and organisations in Norwich and across the county of Norfolk.
The projects include a series of workshops and talks given by experts in their fields to children and other interested groups about the wide variety of local foods that are available in this part of England and the benefits of eating only food that is in season.
In this country the rise of the supermarkets has led to an acceptance that a wide variety of foods from all around the globe are available twelve months of the year and part of our project in Norwich and Norfolk is to teach about sustainability of food supplies and also the nutritional value of locally sourced food.
In the east of England we live in an incredibly fertile and productive part of the UK and we are very lucky to have many small independent food producers as members of Slow Food Norwich who will be working with us on this project during 2016 and into the future.




We have been contacted by Norfolk County Council and also a representative of two Unions in Noroflk to put together a series of talks and workshops for staff working at the Council offices throughout Norfolk and also Union members in the County.
As well as these courses designed to give a wide range of topis on food education we will also have talks by a professional forager for the groups to learn about wild foods and how to distinguish them and cook them.
The forager who is based in the east of England will teach groups of children about foraging for wild foods in our region and will also hold cookery demonstrations and classes with small groups in various locations in Norfolk.
We have several members who are involved with colleges in Norwich and also the University of East Anglia and we are working with them at present to try and set up a new Slow Food group at the University later this year, hopefully before the summer break in June.



We will also have special courses where groups of children can visit the East Anglian coast and spend time with people involved with local fishing communities we are working with and they can learn about many of the types of fishing activity that takes place along our long and diverse coastline, including close to shore dredging for oysters in Essex and fishing for crab in Norfolk.
We also hope to involve groups of children and other community groups in the three large food festivals we are organising in 2016, one in April and another in August in Norwich one in Colchester in September and one in London next November, where much of the focus of these events will be on sustainability in the local food chain in counties across east Anglia.
There will also be many other smaller food events throughout the year in towns throughout the east of England organised by members of Slow Food groups working with us at Slow Food Anglia.